Caller blasts Iowa rep. over pledge of allegiance in schools

In a profanity-filled voicemail, an Iowa woman blasted State Rep. Carter Nordman, accusing him of encouraging ‘White nationalism,’ because of his support for recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools.

‘When did we start teaching White nationalism in schools? Because that’s exactly what the f**k you’re doing, sir, and you have absolutely no right to require something like that,’ the anonymous caller said. 

‘Our children aren’t proud to be American,’ she added, noting that maybe ‘White suburban kids’ may be proud to be U.S. citizens because their rights are afforded to them every day and they don’t have to fight for them,’ but argued that minorities, women, the poor and the elderly are ‘not f***king proud’.

Nordman was one of the legislators who advocated for the recent passage of House File 415, which requires Iowa public schools to recite the pledge and display the American flag at least once each day.

An Iowa woman has accused State Rep. Carter Nordman (pictured) of encouraging 'White nationalism,' because of his support for recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools

An Iowa woman has accused State Rep. Carter Nordman (pictured) of encouraging ‘White nationalism,’ because of his support for recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools

The caller posed several questions to Nordman, routinely asking ‘what are we proud of?’ before citing instances of alleged injustice in the nation. 

‘What are we proud of? We’re proud of our racist history? We’re proud of our racist roots? Is that what we’re proud of?’ she asked. 

‘We’re proud of the fact that not all citizens of the United States are afforded the same rights and the same privileges as the blond-haired blue-eyed ones? That’s a bunch of colonizer bulls**t, Carter. And the fact that you’re f**king perpetuating that is disgusting.’

The caller added: ‘Keep that s**t in the suburbs.’ 

She argued that Nordman, as well as Gov. Kim Reynolds, are teaching Iowa’s students to be U.S. nationalists and that they ‘have absolutely no right’ to do so.

The woman, who vowed the ‘make sure’ Nordman would never be re-elected, called the elected officials ‘absolutely disgusting, despicable, and deplorable’ and said they were furthering the agenda of the former president Donald Trump’s administration.

‘Everything that you stand for is the same bulls**t that the Trump administration stood for, and clearly you and Kim Reynolds still have your head so far up his a** that you can’t f**king tell where one of you ends and the other begins,’ the caller stated. 

Nordman posted a recording of the voicemail on his personal Twitter account with a caption reading: 'Imma just leave this here...'

Nordman posted a recording of the voicemail on his personal Twitter account with a caption reading: ‘Imma just leave this here…’

She also questioned if the Iowa government should be addressing more pressing issues as the start of the school year nears.  

‘There’s so much more important s**t that we could be worried about right now and you’re focusing on the f**king Pledge of Allegiance? Get the f**k out of here, pull your head out of your a** Carter, Jesus f**ing Christ.’ 

Nordman told Fox News he returned the woman’s call but she declined to discuss the bill with him. 

‘I called her back and said I’d be willing to discuss the bill,’ Nordman recalled. 

‘She told me that she had said everything she wanted to tell me in her voicemail and she hung up on me. Our conversation was all of 25 seconds.’

Nordman, who posted a recording of the voicemail on his personal Twitter account, told Fox he shared the message because he ‘thought it was important to show what we are up against’.

‘Some people have a lot of hatred for this country and have a lot of hatred for what the United States stands for,’ he said. 

‘I think the pledge of allegiance can unite us all and do a lot of good for everybody, regardless of your race, your gender, your religion, your sexuality.’ 

Nordman also argued that the woman’s claim that the Pledge of Allegiance promoted White nationalism ‘doesn’t make sense’.

The caller blasted Nordman (left) and Gov. Kim Reynolds (right) over the recent passage of HF 847, a bill containing a number of educational policies that includes one requiring public schools to recite the Pledge of Allegiance daily (Pictured: Legislators after HF 847 signing)

The caller blasted Nordman (left) and Gov. Kim Reynolds (right) over the recent passage of HF 847, a bill containing a number of educational policies that includes one requiring public schools to recite the Pledge of Allegiance daily (Pictured: Legislators after HF 847 signing)

In addition to requiring schools to show the flag and administer the pledge to 1st-12th grade students every day, schools must also fly both the American and Iowa flags on days when weather permits (Pictured: Gov. Reynolds signing HF 847 into law in May 2021)

In addition to requiring schools to show the flag and administer the pledge to 1st-12th grade students every day, schools must also fly both the American and Iowa flags on days when weather permits (Pictured: Gov. Reynolds signing HF 847 into law in May 2021)

‘It doesn’t make sense to call the Pledge of Allegiance ‘White nationalism.’ I’m not sure what the Pledge of Allegiance has to do with race. Our flag clearly does not stand for racism, it does not stand for discrimination,’ he stated.

The representative said he thinks the woman made her comments ‘out of hatred for the country’ and that he should’ve asked her: ‘Where else on this planet is better than America?’

The Iowa House passed House File 415 in February with a 91 to 3 vote. 

Nordman (pictured) says he is 'extremely proud' of the legislation and believes the 'pledge of allegiance can unite us all and do a lot of good for everybody'

Nordman (pictured) says he is ‘extremely proud’ of the legislation and believes the ‘pledge of allegiance can unite us all and do a lot of good for everybody’

In addition to requiring schools to show the flag and administer the pledge to 1st-12th grade students every day, they must also fly both the American and Iowa flags on days when weather permits. 

It was passed in the Senate as part of HF 847, a bill containing a number of educational policies, and signed into law by Gov. Reynolds in May.  

‘I am extremely proud that HF 847, which included my Pledge of Allegiance language, was signed by Governor Reynolds this week,’ Nordman told The Iowa Torch when the bill became law.

‘By being just one of a few states who did not have Pledge of Allegiance language in our code, we were doing a disservice to our students.’

HF 847 includes language allowing students to refrain from reciting the pledge. 

The bill reads: ‘A student shall not be compelled against the student’s objection or those of a student’s parent or guardian to recite the pledge.’

‘When writing the original bill, I wanted to ensure student’s First Amendment rights would not be infringed upon. That is why there is specific language included to protect the First Amendment rights of all students,’ Nordman added, referencing the exemption language. 

Iowa was one of very few U.S. states that did not recite the pledge in schools (Pictured: Utah students reciting the pledge in February 2021). Nordman argued that was a 'disservice to our students, our state and to our country'

Iowa was one of very few U.S. states that did not recite the pledge in schools (Pictured: Utah students reciting the pledge in February 2021). Nordman argued that was a ‘disservice to our students, our state and to our country’

Nordman has routinely advocated for the recitation of the pledge in schools.

Addressing the Iowa House Speaker back in February, Nordman said: ‘At the end of the day, we don’t pledge our allegiance to a government. We don’t pledge our allegiance to a person or a leader. We pledge our loyalty to an idea – the American idea. We pledge our loyalty to the greatest social experiment to ever happen on this planet. 

He asserted that as one of the few state’s that did not recite the pledge in schools, Iowa leaders were ‘doing a disservice to our students, our state and to our country’.

Nordman also argued that while Americans can be on ‘complete opposite sides of the political spectrum,’ citizens can know, at the end of the day, ‘that we’re all united under one flag’.

Social media users, responding to the voicemail, have voiced both support and opposition for Nordman’s legislation.

‘So listen to the concern and move on. Not going to lie though this law does seem pretty North Korean-ish forcing the schools to do this every day,’ wrote Scott, Twitter user @drdjdunk.

‘Honestly, I agree that saying it everyday is probably overkill. But THIS reaction is ridiculous. Equating the Pledge to white nationalism? No. Period,’ David Whitehead replied. 

Social media users responded to the voicemail, voicing both support and opposition for Nordman's legislation

Social media users responded to the voicemail, voicing both support and opposition for Nordman’s legislation

‘The Pledge of Allegiance has been said for years in school. Perhaps if people paid attention to the part about liberty and justice for all then things would be better. If you think saying the pledge is bad, you’ve got a problem,’ argued @Warbird_Nut.

‘Besides the language she used, she’s right. Apparently the 1943 SCOTUS decision regarding compulsory displays of patriotism doesn’t apply in your state,’ @TDM43563710 tweeted. 

‘I’m of Native American bloodlines…so let’s compare who had it worse….yet I have no problem saying the pledge of allegiance!’ @Kpb90058 shared.

 ‘It’s people like this that actually are making are country divided! If she doesn’t like it here, well, then just move back to the country of your roots.’

Leave a Reply